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Ovulation and Pregnancy Test FAQ

Ovulation Predictors >> Ovulation and Pregnancy Test FAQ

Frequently Asked Testing Questions

Get Pregnant - 5 Essential TipsFor Ovulation Test FAQ, click here.

Q: How do Early Pregnancy Tests work?

Q: Test Sensitivity and Early-Detection: Does the hCG level of the pregnancy test matter?

Q: How do I use an Early-Pregnancy-Tests pregnancy test?

Q: How accurate are home pregnancy tests?

Q: How long does it take to see pregnancy test results?

Q: How long do I need to hold my urine? Is first morning urine the best sample?

Q: If the test band is faint, is the pregnancy test still positive?

Q: How is it possible to receive a "False Positive" result on a pregnancy test?

Q: What if the test is negative after the 5 minute reaction time, but becomes positive after an hour?

Q: Can I be pregnant and not get a positive HPT (a False Negative result)?

Q: Can fertility drugs or medication interfere with pregnancy test results?

Q:How do Early-Pregnancy-Tests home pregnancy tests work?

Early-Pregnancy-Tests.com offers both test strips and midstream tests that measure the presence of the hormone hCG in your urine. HCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) is a glycoprotein hormone secreted by the developing placenta shortly after fertilization. The appearance of hCG soon after conception and its subsequent rise in concentration during early gestational growth make it an excellent marker for the early detection of pregnancy.

Q: Test Sensitivity and Early-Detection: Does the hCG level of the test matter?

Not all pregnancy tests are created equal. Early-Pregnancy-Tests.com provides the most sensitive pregnancy tests on the market. The more sensitive the test, the earlier the opportunity to detect pregnancy. Our tests can detect pregnancy even with a small amount of hCG in your system. Concentrations of hCG are reported in milliInternational Units (mIU) or amounts equal to 1/1000th of an IU per milliliter. Pregnancy tests with a sensitivity of 20 mIU/ml are more sensitive than tests with 50 to 100 mIU/ml.

Our Pregnancy Tests
20 mIU/ml hCG
E.P.T.
50 mIU/ml hCG
Wallgreens
50 mIU/ml hCG
Rite-Aid
50 mIU/ml hCG
Answer
100 mIU/ml hCG

At 20 mIU/ml, high sensitivity equates to early detection of pregnancy. -That means you can begin testing accurately as early as six to eight days after conception - well before your first missed period. NOTE: Conception may take place several days after date of intercourse, so the date of intercourse should not be viewed as the necessary day of conception.

Q: How do I use the Early-Pregnancy-Tests pregnancy test?

Taking a home pregnancy test is simple - though instructions must be followed precisely for both test strips and midstream tests. For test strips, immerse the strip into the urine sample with the arrow end pointing towards the urine. Do not immerse past the MAX (Marker Line). Take the strip out after 3 seconds and lay the strip flat on a clean, dry, non-absorbent surface. Next, wait for colored bands to appear. Depending on the concentration of hCG in the test specimen, positive results may be observed in as little as 40 seconds. However, to confirm negative results, the complete reaction time of 5 minutes is required. Do not read results after the 5 minute reaction time. For complete test instructions, click here: Pregnancy Test Strips Instructions.

With the pregnancy midstream test, turn the test stick so that the handle is facing you and the absorbent tip is located on the bottom, facing down. With the handle side of the test stick facing you and the twin absorbent tip pointing in a downward direction, hold the test stick in your stream of urine (and hold it for at least six seconds so that adequate urine contacts the absorbent end). Seal the absorbent windows with the cap. In 2 to 5 minutes, a rose-pink color band (control band) will appear in the window to show that the test is complete. For complete instructions and images for interpreting results, click here: Pregnancy Midstream Test Instructions.

Q: How accurate are home pregnancy tests?

Under laboratory conditions, home pregnancy tests are 99% percent accurate. Inaccuracies are most often traced or errors in application or failure to follow instructions with care. There are circumstances and variables - discussed in questions below - that may impact pregnancy test results (from fertility medications to dilution of urine sample).

Q: How long do I need to hold my urine? Is first morning urine the best sample?

Because home pregnancy tests detect hCG, it is best to collect urine samples containing the highest presence of the hCG hormone. Diluted samples (from drinking high volumes of water / frequent urination) are not recommended and can diminish test accuracy. Instead, first morning urine is considered the ideal sample as it contains the most concentrated presence of hCG. Otherwise, waiting several hours (4-5 minimum) is also considered sufficient duration for an HPT.

Q: If the test band is faint, is the pregnancy test positive?

A positive result will always be indicated by the presence of a distinct color band in the 'test' region of the pregnancy test strip or midstream test (accompanied by the presence of the 'control' band). If the test is faint (in comparison to the control band), the test may be positive, though the presence of hCG in the woman's body - or urine sample - may be low. The presence of hCG doubles every two days in a pregnant woman. In cases where a faint test color band is present, we recommend that you retake the test the following day using first morning urine. Again, following test instructions is critical. Click here for our Instructions Page.

Q: How is it possible to receive a "False Positive" result on a pregnancy test?

False positive tests are rare - though there are instances and conditions where they can occur. For example, some tissues in a non-pregnant woman can produce hCG, though the levels are usually so low they are not detectable by home pregnancy tests (though our tests are the most sensitive on the market). Secondly, research indicates that half of all "conceptions" (fertilized eggs) do not go forward as a developing pregnancy. Within this group, a proportion are recognized as "a chemical pregnancy" - a pregnancy in which there is a positive pregnancy test and no other signs or symptoms).

Moreover, A percentage of "false positive" pregnancy tests can be attributed to misinterpretation of results due to a failure to follow test instructions with precision. You should not rely on any positive result that does not show up within the time limit stated in the test instructions (see next question below).

Q: What if the test is negative after the 5 minute reaction time, but becomes positive after an hour?

Do not attempt to interpret results after the five minute test reaction time. Depending on the concentration of hCG in the test specimen, positive results may be observed in as little as 40 seconds. However, to confirm negative results, the complete reaction time of 5 minutes is required. A positive result can only be determined within this time interval. A percentage of "false positive" pregnancy tests can be attributed to misinterpretation of results due to a failure to follow test instructions with precision. Here, you should not rely on any positive result that does not show up within the time limit stated in the test instructions. All pregnancy test brands have the possibility of displaying an evaporation line.

Q: Can I be pregnant and not get a positive HPT (a False Negative result)?

False negative results are more common than false positives - and are primarily due to inaccuracies in timing of the test or carelessness in the test procedure itself. Please follow test instructions with circumspection and precision. A false negative result can also stem from using a diluted urine sample and/or from taking a test too early in pregnancy. First morning urine contains the most concentrated presence of hCG - which makes it the ideal sample for pregnancy testing.

Additionally, at the same gestational stages, women produce quantitatively different levels of hCG - which means that the first indication of a positive result on a home pregnancy test may vary between women, despite similar gestational stage. If you suspect you are pregnant, you should see your doctor for a blood hCG test no matter what result you get from any home pregnancy test.

Q: Can fertility drugs or medication interfere with pregnancy test results?

The only medications that can cause a false positive on a home pregnancy test are those than contain hCG itself. If you are taking fertility medications with hCG - e.g. Novarel, Profasi, Pregnyl - please consult your doctor regarding appropriate times and circumstances for using our tests. Other fertility drugs and medications that do not contain hCG will not precipitate false positive results. Similarly, progesterone will not cause a false positive as well.

Ovulation Test FAQ

Q: How do ovulation tests (or ovulation predictor kits, OPK) work?

Q: What is the best time of day to take the ovulation test?

Q: Should I take the ovulation test the same time every day?

Q: When should I begin testing with the ovulation predictor kits?

Q: How long after my LH surge will ovulation take place?

Q: When I get a positive on an ovulation test, when is the best time to have intercourse?

Q: Does the appearance of faint 'test band' indicate an LH surge?

Q: Does taking my basal body temperature tell me the same thing as an OPK?

Q: Can OPKs be used as contraception devices?

Q: How do ovulation tests (or Ovulation Predictor Kits, OPK) work?

The ovulation predictor kit is designed to detect luteinizing hormone, or LH. In elevated quantities, LH causes ovulation. During the menstrual cycle only a small amount of LH is made, but in the middle of the cycle LH briefly and dramatically increases. This increase is called the "LH surge" and precedes ovulation. Conception is most likely to occur within thirty-six hours following the LH surge. Our ovulation tests are specifically designed to detect your LH surge - the time when you are likely to ovulate, the best time to conceive a baby.

Q: What is the best time of day to take the ovulation test?

Unlike pregnancy tests, morning is not the ideal time to take ovulation tests, as LH is synthesized in your body early in the morning. It will not show up in urine until later in the day. The ideal time to test is in the afternoon, around 2pm, though testing may safely take place from 10am to early evening.

Q: Should I take the test the same time every day?

Yes, be sure to test at the same time each day. Also, reduce your liquid intake around 2 hours before testing urine as a diluted liquid sample can prevent LH detection.

Q: When should I beginning testing with the ovulation predictor kit?

To determine when to start testing, you must first determine the length of your menstrual cycle. The length of the menstrual cycle is the number of days from the first day of menstrual bleeding to the day before bleeding begins on the next period. Determine the usual length of the menstrual cycle over the last few months. Then, refer to the Cycle Chart to determine on which day of the menstrual cycle to begin testing.

Your Cycle Length

Day to Begin Testing

21 days Day 5
22 days Day 6
23 days Day 7
24 days Day 8
25 days Day 9
26 days Day 10
27 days Day 11
28 days Day 12
29 days Day 13
30 days Day 14
31 days Day 15
32 days Day 16
33 days Day 17
34 days Day 18
35 days Day 19
36 days Day 20
37 days Day 21
38 days Day 22
39 days Day 23

Q: How long after my LH surge will ovulation take place?

Generally, ovulation will take place 12-48 hours after the LH surge is first detected (using afternoon urine samples), though 36 hours is considered to be the average length of time following the LH surge.

Q: When I get a positive on an ovulation test, when is the best time to have intercourse?

To increase the chance of conception, it is best to have intercourse the day of the LH surge as well as following three days after.

Q: Does the appearance of faint 'test band' indicate an LH surge?

A faint line (or a faint positive test band) does not indicate a positive result for an LH surge. While the presence of a faint line on a pregnancy test may indicate a positive result, a faint line on an OPK is always negative. Please refer to the images on our instruction pages to interpret results.

Q: Does taking my basal body temperature tell me the same thing as an OPK?

Basal Body Temperature only tells of your LH surge after it is over. That is why the BBT method cannot predict the LH surge. Ovulation tests will tell you - with pinpoint accuracy - when your chances for conception are greatest.

Q: Can OPKs be used as contraception devices?

Ovulation tests are designed to help facilitate pregnancy. They are not recommended for contraception.

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